Tag Archive: instructions


For Halloween weekend, Seneca and I did something special.

We made Skittle Vodka.

It was a couple weeks ago that I read one of Barefoot Foodie‘s posts and immediately knew that it was something I needed to do.

It was something I had never heard of and I was a little embarrassed that I didn’t think of it myself. Regardless, when I saw it, I knew I needed to enlist someone to do this with me. Seneca was just the girl.

While I was going by the instructions I had found and making vodka with the regular version of skittles, Seneca opted to make her batch of skittle vodka out of the tropical kind.

I posted a preliminary picture of this activity on my facebook page the day I started this project.

Ohhhh, yes!!

What I Used:

  • 2 big bags of skittles
  • (just over) a fifth of vodka (any kind will do!)
  • four plastic bottles
  • measuring cup
  • 4 glasses
  • lots and lots of coffee filters

I sorted each of the colors into cutesy plastic cups we had in the basement. One of the “recipes” we found said that only 60 skittles were necessary per 6 ounces of vodka but I just used 2 whole bags.  I started out by counting but decided it was a waste of time since I didn’t intend on wasting the leftover skittles.

Once they were all sorted, I sniped a pic because I like when things are organized. The purple ones are in a different cup because they were being rejected. I hate grape flavored things.

I should mention that I poured about 7 ounces of vodka into each of the plastic containers. Once all the skittles were sorted by color, I dumped the skittles into the vodka. Right away, the color started dissolving off of the skittles. Every time I walked by them, I gave each of the plastic bottles a good shake to help the candy dissolve.  It takes a while for the skittles to dissolve all the way. I let mine sit overnight.  Actually, they probably sat for a little over 24 hours.

Once all the candy was dissolved I began the long, long project of straining the skittle vodka mixture. You can see in my picture that I used hair ties to secure the coffee filters around the glasses and poured a little bit of the vodka in each glass. If you plan on making skittle vodka, I suggest you make sure you have plenty of time to strain your vodka. It took a long time and it’s a messy job. (Or I’m a child and always end up making a mess. Or, I’m a shit show and no matter what I do, I always end up sticky and covered in vodka. Either one.)

I don’t know if you’re supposed to strain it more than once, but I only strained mine once. I didn’t have any more patience by the time it was done with the first round. The most important thing is just to make sure it’s not lumpy and that you don’t have any white stuff floating around. (That sounds disgusting.)

Oh, I also changed coffee filters often.

I don’t have any more pictures of the skittle vodka process but once everything was strained and the original plastic containers were cleaned, I put the newly strained skittle-infused vodka back into the plastic containers. After that, I put the vodka in the freezer. Where it belongs.

It remained in the freezer until we were ready to drink.

There are lots of different ways to enjoy this fun little treat but we drank ours in the form of shots. Because we’re out of our minds. We did chase it with sprite, though, and that was delish.

If you drink responsibly, you could probably mix it and use actual ice cubes or something. And sip it rather than chugging it. I don’t know.

Anyway, it was awesome and I would totally do it again. Only next time I would think about laying down newspaper on the counter or something and covering myself in plastic and wearing gloves so I didn’t end up covered in it like I did this time.

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When closing arguments began, I had no idea what I would decide. I was dying to know what my fellow jurors thought of everything we had heard. Throughout the four days we were in court, we couldn’t speak to each other about anything relating to the case. Every minute spent together in the jury room was filled with small talk. I couldn’t wait to actually be able to talk about the case, ask the questions that had been haunting my dreams, and finally wrap my head around all the facts.

There was one minor hiccup once all was said and done by the attorneys. There were thirteen of us. Only twelve would go back to the jury room and deliberate. I hoped to high heaven I wouldn’t be the one to be dismissed. How disappointing it would be to sit through the entire trial and then simply be released, to be thanked for one’s service and dismissed with no other words. I would have been pissed. But, as it stands, that didn’t happen to me. The juror in seat three was released.

The judge read us our instructions and then we filed back into our ever familiar jury room.  I took my regular seat and waited to see what would happen next.  First thing was first: we were going to order some lunch. And I was to be the one to record everyone’s order due to my neat handwriting. (I always knew I’d be good for something!) Ordering lunch was a feat in and of itself but we finally got it under control. We called Mike, our court officer, and gave him our order.

That was when deliberations began. During the time it took to figure out what everyone was eating for lunch, we had also decided our foreman. Rather than picking the woman who has sat on a jury every two years since 1985, we went with the man she nominated, who sat in seat number four. We decided to tackle the lesser charges first, and then discuss the big one. It didn’t take long at all to go around the table and say “guilty” to the first count of furnishing alcohol to a minor (Brianna).  We then did the same thing for the second count of furnishing alcohol to a minor (Monika).

To begin our discussion, we went through each of our witnesses and judged his or her credibility. In doing so, we got to hash out all of the details of the case.  We tried to come up with our own timeline of events; we tried to figure out exactly what happened. We tried to determine what seemed to make sense. It was seriously difficult.  That’s when we all started to agree upon all of the holes in the story. We all seemed to have the same questions and a couple of our own theories.

The element of personal injury to the charge of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree needed to be met. While there had been a 2 millimeter “laceration” noted in the medical records of the victim, the sexual assault nurse examiner couldn’t rule out other causes of the injury, nor could she determine how long that injury had been there. The fact that there was no physical, DNA evidence anywhere could have been overlooked had the story made any sense at all.  The personal vendetta theory that the defense had been working on started to seem more and more likely the more we went over what the witnesses had testified. And don’t even get me started on the 9-1-1 tape. We listened to it at least 7 times. I could probably quote it, verbatim.  The worst part: all of it was a fabrication; the victim’s friend/girlfriend had called 9-1-1 and pretended to be the victim. And when questioned on the witness stand by the prosecuting attorney, who was livid, she didn’t have an explanation for her actions.

All in all, we couldn’t convict him of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree because we all experienced reasonable doubt.  It’s such an interesting concept, one that I didn’t even really understand until I felt it.

When we reached our verdict, I wrote Mike the note (“We have reached a verdict”) since we weren’t allowed to speak to him. Another juror called down to his office and told him we had the note ready. Then we waited a few minutes and were called back into the courtroom.  The judge asked our foreman if we reached a verdict and then he read what we had decided.

I still can’t believe I did this, but when our foreman read the verdict, I was looking at the judge.  Can you believe that? I was looking at the judge, rather than the defendant. I thought to look at him, to read his facial expression, after we had moved onto the lesser charges. I missed his very first reaction to the “not guilty” verdict for criminal sexual conduct. By the time I looked over, he looked relieved. He was shaking the hand of his attorney and he looked… thankful. In my head, I decided he was on the verge of tears because he was so relieved.

As soon as he finished reading our verdict, we were shuffled back into the jury room one last time. We waited only a few minutes before the judge came in and talked to us. She seemed to agree with our verdict, which made me feel even better about the choices we had made. She spoke candidly to us about the case. It was really awesome.

Obviously, I think you all can tell that I really, really loved my jury duty experience. I feel like I can honestly say that it is probably one of the most important things I have ever done, and I just know I’ll never forget it. And, just for the record, I think everyone should sit on a jury at least once. It’s an amazing experience!